Winter Woolie TLC..

Winter Woolie TLC..

I thought it would do a bit of a “housekeeping” blog this week- dealing with how to care for your winter woollies- mainly due to the amount of use they are currently getting (!!) but also due to the fact that they will have cost a few pennies in the first place so you want to look after them to ensure that they last and give you the wear you want out of them.

Basic care:

This may sound obvious but before assuming your knitwear is suitable for a machine wash, check the label; some items will be hand wash only. However, my machine has a hand wash cycle so don’t assume you actually have to get your hands wet- check to see if you have one too.

If you do need to hand wash, ensure you turn the item inside out and use cool water with a gentle, hand wash detergent. Leaving them to soak for 5-10 minutes is ideal and try not to pull or rub the item as this can lead to it becoming misshapen. 

Always re-shape and then lay your wool item out on a clean towel before gently rolling it up in the towel to remove any excess moisture. Once done dry the item on a flat rack.

If your woollies can be put in the washing machine I would advise:

* Never washing above 30 degrees

* Use the ‘wool’, ‘gentle’ or ‘delicate’ cycle

* Put items in a washable laundry bag to ensure they don’t get stretched or misshapen

* NEVER put woollies in the tumble dryer (unless you want them to come out several sizes smaller!)

Storing Your Woolies…

Ensure moths don’t get at your prized cashmere by only putting away clean items; moths feed off sweat and stains. To help with this further wear a layer between your skin and your woollen item to ‘catch’ any perspiration. Moth deterrents can be purchased from places like Amazon and John Lewis and do a great job of keeping them at bay too.

Folding and storing items flat is better then hanging them as the hanging can cause them to become misshapen.

If you do get a visit by the little blighters (and they really are- as once they are “in” they are merciless in their destruction) my advice is as follows:

  1. You can kill the moths/eggs by very high (over 60 degrees)  or very low temperatures (below 5 degrees). The high temperatures are achieved by dry cleaning only (as you obviously can’t put them in  a hot wash as it will shrink / damage the itme)  or you could go for the much cheaper option of packing the items into plastic bags and putting them in the freezer for 3 days to kill the eggs/moths. 
  2. After three days then put them in the wash at their normal cycle and then dry as usual.
  3. In the meantime hoover out and clean the wardrobe/drawers. Around the gaps where carpet meets skirting/wall inside the wardrobe – take your hairdryer and blast as this will kill any remaining moths and eggs.
  4. Pack cashmere and wool jumpers into clear plastic bags
  5. Hang plentiful lavender bags, cedar balls, mothballs- whatever you like the smell of, all around your wardrobe to prevent them wanting to come back.
  6. During the summer when you are less likely to be wearing these types of fabrics – freeze, wash, dry and pack them all away into lock tight bags to prevent the months taking residence until winter.

Keep Bobbles At Bay

Unfortunately, woollen items do have a tendency to bobble, but have no fear, there is a solution!

You can buy clever little de-bobbling machines online for around £5-10 (I got this one for Christmas ..its brilliant), or these combs are good too. The key is to stay on top of them before they get too big or too many, so give your woollen item the once-over each time to wear it.

Hope that helps…any questions- just hola!

I thought you might like to know there is a fashion show event in Cheltenham next week on Tuesday January 22nd: 6.30-9,30pm at the Queens Hotel. It will be showcasing race-wear couture as well as Sahar Freemantle Millener. Here is a link to get tickets (its free!!)

In the meantime- links to all my social media channels below should you wish to get more of my styling ideas and tips on a daily basis!

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 Kate x